Providing Cost Data

To become a TUNE Certified Partner, you’ll need to provide cost data to Attribution Analytics for use in giving cost insights to mutual clients. This article goes through the methods you, as an advertising partner (publisher), can share your cost data with Attribution Analytics.

This article is part of our Popular Features series.

How Cost Data Is Collected

Advertisers can collect cost data by first setting it up in the Attribution Analytics platform. TUNE then accepts this cost data dynamically via measurement URLs for clicks and/or impressions.

Dynamically Providing Cost Data in Measurement URLs

TUNE supports two parameters for dynamically collecting cost data from both clicks and impressions. Here are the values provided for those parameters then define how we calculate cost:

cost – Amount of cost formatted as float. Must be in USD.

cost_model – One of the following cost models:

  • cpv – Cost per View (Impression)
  • cpm – Cost per 1000 Impressions
  • cpc – Cost per Click
  • cpi – Cost per Install
  • cpa – Cost per Action
    • If “cpa” is used as the cost model, one of the following additional parameters must be included to ensure the cost is applied to the correct in-app event.
      • cost_target_event_type – The predefined event type (e.g. “registration”) or the exact name of the site_event.
      • cost_target_event_id – The ID of a site_event.
  • cpo – Cost per Open

For example, your platform supports the macro %cost_model% for our cost_model parameter and %cost% for the amount of the cost. Our platform would generate a measurement URL for clicks mapping your macros to our parameters:

https://YOUR_PUBLISHER_ID.api-01.com/serve?action=click&publisher_id=19228&site_id=15284&cost_model=%cost_model%&cost=%cost%

If your cost model is CPC and the amount you charge a client on click was $0.01 then the URL with your macros replaced looks like this:

https://YOUR_PUBLISHER_ID.api-01.com/serve?action=click&publisher_id=19228&site_id=15284&cost_model=cpc&cost=0.01

If you only use one cost model for all clients you work with and don’t have a macro for the cost model, then we can manually set the value as part of the integration. For example, if you only work on a CPI basis, then our cost_model parameter can be hardcoded to “cost_model=cpi”. Then the cost amount can still be set dynamically with your macro:

https://YOUR_PUBLISHER_ID.api-01.com/serve?action=click&publisher_id=19228&site_id=15284&cost_model=cpi&cost=%cost%

To provide further insight on how we calculate cost based on the values set in the measurement URL, consider the following cases:

Case 1:

Impression request with cost_model=cpm and cost=2.00

Attribution Analytics attributes the impression with “cost” of $0.002

Case 2:

Impression request with cost_model=cpv and cost=0.05

Attribution Analytics attributes the impression with “cost” of $0.05

Case 3:

Impression Attribution View Percentage set for partner as 50%

Impression request with view percentage of 75%, cost_model=cpv and cost=0.05

Attribution Analytics attributes the impression with “cost” of $0.05

Case 4:

Impression Attribution View Percentage set for partner as 50%

Impression request with view percentage of 25%, cost_model=cpv and cost=0.05

Attribution Analytics attributes the impression with “cost” of $0.00

* no cost since user didn’t reach impression attribution view percentage

Case 5:

Click request with cost_model=cpc and cost=0.50

Attribution Analytics attributes the click with “cost” of $0.50

Case 6:

Click request with cost_model=cpi and cost=2.50

Click log measured with “cost” of $0

Install request and attributed to click above

Attribution Analytics attributes the install with “cost” of $2.50

Case 7:

Impression request with cost_model=cpi and cost=2.50

Impression log measured with “cost” of $0

No clicks

Install request and attributed to impression above as view-through (enabled by client)

Attribution Analytics attributes the install with “cost” of $2.50

You can find more information about cost data in Attribution Analytics in following articles:

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